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CrypticWolf Offline

Godfather of Metal


Beiträge: 3.938

21.04.2006 17:26
#421 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

ich finde es hört sich so an wie immer! slayer eben! es wird genauso wie alle anderen klingen!



I'm not a slave to a god that doesn't exist,
I'm not a slave to a world that doesn't give a shit; (Marilyn Manson)

keep creeping & banging

mig Offline

Veritas † Aequitas


Beiträge: 6.208

21.04.2006 18:12
#422 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Dem würde ich uneingeschränkt zustimmen

Warum labern die eigentlich immer von "Kids" ?!?!?!



Homepage: http://www.andy-schaefer.com

ChuckSchuldiner Offline

Scary Guy/Gal


Beiträge: 1.662

22.04.2006 14:39
#423 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Weil das nunmal der Eindruck ist, den du hast, wenn du in der Gefallenenliste 17-19jährige siehst. Die sind halt noch halbe Kinder. ;)

Kirk Hamster Offline

The Prince/Princess


Beiträge: 779

25.04.2006 12:23
#424 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Neues von Slayer und kerry King von Knac.com

KNAC.COM: I read this morning that you’d just finished the actual recording?

KING: Pretty much. We’re probably 70-75 percent done. Most of the basic recording’s been finished, we just have to put the leads done, work out some of the lyrics and vocals and probably do a little fix-it work. We’ve done all the heavy lifting, I guess you could say.

KNAC.COM: How’s it gone so far?

KING: Pretty good. We usually come in pretty well prepared, and we know what we wanna do, which is make a Slayer album! So there’s not a lot of sitting around trying to figure out what the fuck’ going on. We usually go in and just hammer it out. By the time it’s mixed, we’ll probably be looking about a two months on the studio, which is pretty quick in this day and age.

KNAC.COM: As opposed to Metallica, who’s probably going to be taking up a lot of [producer and label head] Rick Rubin’s time over the next year or two.

KING: That’s just a waste of time, (laughs). I don’t know why anybody does that. I don’t know how much of that kinda shit Rubin will put up with, but guess we’ll see.

KNAC.COM: If that psychiatrist enters the picture again ...

KING: (Laughs) That’s what rehearsals are for. You work out your shit there — at least that’s what we do. You’re already paying that monthly rent, why try to work it out in the studio when you’re paying by the day. They probably don’t have to worry about shit like that, as many albums as they sell, but we do. Rubin’s worked with some pretty "unique" personalities [Johnny Cash, Beastie Boys, Slipknot, Neil Diamond] over the years, so I’m sure he’s up to the challenge, but he’s probably gonna have his hands full with them.

KNAC.COM: Have you seen much of Rubin this time, has he had much to do with this album?

KING: I haven’t seen Rick this entire time, and I don’t expect to.

KNAC.COM: If he’s going to be credited as "executive producer," what does that actually?

KING: For him it means, "I own the record company" (laughs). It’s been pretty much just us and Josh [Abraham], who’s really producing the album.

KNAC.COM: How have things gone with him?

KING: It sounds really good. Josh says it’s one of the best sounding album’s he’s ever done. At the end of the day that’s probably 75 percent what we bring into the studio and the other 25 percent is how he and the engineer get it from where it’s making noise to where it sounds like Slayer. And that takes a lot of skill and technique as well. But we’re not trying anything fruity, it sounds like a damn Slayer record (laughs).

KNAC.COM: That was my next question. As far as the Slayer pantheon goes, would you say it’s more like a God Hates Us All/Seasons kind of record or a South Of Heaven/Diabulos record?

KING: I think it’s definitely got more God Hates flavor to it. But I said before we even started recording what I thought it was going to sound like, which was a mix between God Hates and Seasons, because this is the first time Dave’s recorded with us since Seasons. And that’s probably right about where it is.

KNAC.COM: What’s the big difference between recording with Paul [Bostaph] on drums and recording with Dave?

KING: With Dave, he was the one who was there in the beginning, he created this with us. And now that he’s back, it’s really cool. He’s still really into the music. It flows really good and when he goes into the recording you never know what he’s gonna play. We’ll hear it and we’ll be like "well goddamn! Dave’s making shit up again" (Laughs).

KNAC.COM: Has his work with Apocalyptica and, especially, Fantomas had an effect, do you think?

KING: Probably, because he’s dabbled in some things that we haven’t. So it might bring a different flavor to something by him doing his own thing. It was probably in our best interest that we parted ways when we did, I know it was because we were ready to kill him at that time (laughs). Now that he’s back everyone is over all the issues we had back then and it’s the same band down the line. We’ve all grown up.

KNAC.COM: For a while there the drummer situation was like Spinal Tap.

KING: Yeah, except no one died (laughs). It did seem like that, because Dave left and came back, then left again. The Paul left and came back. But at least we had the stability of having two major drummers, instead of 15. Jon [Dette] was only on board for a little while before Paul came back and Tony [Scaglione] wasn’t there for very long before Lombardo came back the first time.

KNAC.COM: The main songwriting duties seem to slingshot back and forth between you and Jeff. Is this more of a Jeff album, or a Kerry album?

KING: I think I did most of Divine, Jeff did most of Diabulos, I did most of God Hates and I think I did most of this one, too. But Tom and Jeff definitely wrote for this one too, just like with the others that I wrote the majority for.

KNAC.COM: How does that work, is it whoever comes up with the most stuff or the best stuff or is it just who is more inspired to write?

KING: That’s probably it. It’s not who comes up with the most or the best because we pretty much write for the record. There’s no extra songs this time. I’ve got ideas I haven’t finished and Jeff and Tom have some ideas they haven’t finished, but when we get one we feel is done, we just present it and start learning it. If a riff don’t fly it gets taken out before anyone gets too attached to it (laughs).

Me and Jeff have been doing this for a long time and if he says that riff’s not gonna be happening, nine times out of 10 we’ll change it by the end of the week. Or if I think it’s really gonna be cool, I’ll like wait, wait, wait, I’ve got some lyrics that really go with it, just bear me out, and usually he comes around. That happened a lot on the last album. So there is a lot of back and forth no matter who’s actually putting the songs together.

KNAC.COM: How many songs will be on the new album?

KING: As far as I know, there’s gonna be 11, because that’s how many we wrote. And that’s worldwide. Usually we have a couple leftover for the foreign markets, but this time I don’t think we’re going to do anything extra, even cover songs, because we’ve already torn down the drums, we’ve changed studios, we’re working on stitching everything together, so we’d be hard pressed to do anything else.

KNAC.COM: Is there anything that’s dramatically different this time? Or, like you said before, does it just "sound like a Slayer record?

KING: That’s pretty much it. Different ideas, different riffs, but the meat’s still what you think of when you think of Slayer.

KNAC.COM: How about lyrically?

KING: It’s pretty much saying the same thing in a different way (laughs). That’s just what we do. Some people would say a song or two sound like equals to "Disciple." Songs about God and Satan. That’s what we write about.

I think probably the coolest angle is one Jeff did, I’m not sure if Tom helped him or not, but it was Jeff’s idea, it’s a song called "Jihad." It’s more from the other side, the other perspective, not our perspective, of what’s behind this war we’re in now. You see it through the eyes of "the enemy" and what they might be thinking.

KNAC.COM: Steve Earle did something like that about the American kid [John Walker Lindh] who joined the Taliban and was captured in Afghanistan, trying to see things through his eyes, and he got no end of shit for it.

KING: I’m sure we will, too. But it’s just one song and it’s the only one that really has to do with anything like that. No. 1, we don’t want to dwell on it because every band on the planet already has. And No. 2, every other band on the planet came from a certain perspective and we had to come up with a different one, otherwise what’s the different. We’re Slayer, we have to be different. So we said our piece and moved on.

It’s not like we’re trying to promote the other side’s perspective in the war, or their ideology, or whatever you want to call it, but I’m sure some people will see it that way.

KNAC.COM: Kinda like what happened with "Angel of Death" where people were branding you Nazi sympathizers.

KING: Yeah, that was blown out proportion. People thinking they know what it says without really reading it. And that will happen with every record for everybody, because people like to take an opinion without being informed about anything. It’s easier to just shoot your mouth off because the more noise you make the less basis in fact your argument has to be because people are too dumb to recognize the difference.

KNAC.COM: God Hates Us All came out on Sept. 11, 2001. What was your take on that, tragic irony or proof of the album’s title?

KING: My take on it was, "I told you so!" If there was ever any doubt, how could there be now. Everyone has tragedy and that was our first bit of tragedy on that scale in many, many years. If it’s God, if it’s Buddha, whoever the masses have as the basis of their faith, everybody has tragedy. If God is all knowing, if God is all good, then why doesn’t God stop stuff like that?

KNAC.COM: Still, some of the lyrics, especially in "Disciple," "New Faith" and "God Send Death" are so eeriely prophetic, when you read ‘em now it’s spooky.

KING: A lot of that kind of shit was going on before Sept. 11, obviously just nothing of scale. Fundamentalism, extremism, fanaticism, whatever you want to call it was on the rise all over the place, here too, and there were bombings and shit happening everywhere in the name of God, or Allah, or whatever deity people choose to bow down to. My point was religion, God, is the world’s great divider. It preaches love and peace, but it splits people up and sets them against each other, and I reject it all. Like I was saying then, "I got my own philosophy," which is to hate everyone equally.

When you’ve got all these fanatics lining up in this corner and that thinking they’re right and everyone else is wrong, something’s gonna go down. Unfortunately for us, it went down here [on Sept. 11]. And I doubt we’ve seen the last of it.

KNAC.COM: Comforting thought. Going back to "Jihad," is war a prevailing theme on the new album?

KING: To a certain extent. Tom wrote one about the after effects of war called "Eyes of the Insane." I’ve written one that at the moment is called "Flesh Storm." It starts out being about if you’re a soldier and what it’s like to be in the midst of war, but then it changes to the media’s perception of it and how the media sensationalizes everything. It’s kind of cool how it worked out.

KNAC.COM: How about some of the other material?

KING: I have one called "Supremist." Jeff did one called "Black Serenade." There’s another one called "Consfearacy." Then there’s, let’s see, "Cult," "Catalyst," "Catatonic" — a lot of one-word titles (laughs). That’s just about all of them. It’s a pretty good mix of fast, brutal stuff and slower, moodier stuff. It’s pretty intense.

KNAC.COM: This year is the 20th anniversary of Reign In Blood. You did a few "Raining Blood" shows on your last tour two years ago, will you do anything more, or is the celebration over?

KING: I would imagine we did it and it’s time to move on, but never say never. I know Japan never saw it, South America and Australia never saw it. So you never know.

We only did a few of those shows. There was the one in Maine for the DVD, which was a one-off that was done a certain way that we didn’t do when we did those shows on the Jagermeister tour. On the video, it was a different effect where we were literally doused by a bucket right before "Raining Blood," whereas during the tour it was more of a sprinkler system toward the end of the set, and the liquid had to be diluted so it was make through the system. It was better for us too, because that stuff on the DVD was thick like tar and really sticky. My guitar didn’t like it, that was the last time I played it. Right after that, I gave it to the Hard Rock Cafe.

KNAC.COM: When you were recording the "classic" that Reign In Blood would become, did it feel any different than any of your other albums. Was there a certain magic there, or was it like any other Slayer album?

KING: Yeah, it was the same we feel every time. I wish there was more to it than that, I know it sounds boring. But that’s just how we work. With that one, that was the best songs we had. They were the 10, which is why it was so short. At that time, Rick told us if we had 10 songs we had an album, so that’s what we had.

It could be the same thing with this record. These are the songs, the best of the ideas we had. If this record, for some reason, turns into that, 20 years from now you can look back at this and hear us saying, "yeah, it’s just the next record, dude." That’s all there is to it.

KNAC.COM: That album seems to grow more revered as time goes on, it’s quite a phenomenon.

KING: It’s fine by me, it means we must have done something good. I don’t spend much of my life dissecting what people think about this or that, but it is pretty cool that something you did that long ago is still making such an impact. So good for us (laughs).

KNAC.COM: "Raining Blood" even ended up on a South Park episode a little while ago.

KING: Yeah. That was pretty funny. And I’m glad to know Matt and Trey are fans because I think their show is brilliant. It’s too bad the network’s been pussying out on them lately [with the Scientology and Prophet Muhammed episodes]. But it was good to see the song being put to good use, if we can horrify some hippies we’ve done our job.

KNAC.COM: Like you were saying before, you’ve been doing this quite awhile. Have you thought about how much longer you might want to carry this on, or will we be seeing your version of the Rolling Stones "Steel Wheels" tour when you guys are 60?

KING: I hope not. I don’t see how this music would translate that late in the game because it is a workout. I don’t want to come out on some reunion gig where we’re all lethargic and can’t even headbang. That’s part of seeing the show, not just listening to it, not just the lights and the backdrop, but the energy we all deliver on the stage. That’s probably going to have the most bearing on when the band hangs it up, that or if for some reason it becomes unfun, and I’m hoping it stays fun forever.

It just depends how long everyone wants to do it. We’ve got this record pretty much in the bag, I could see us doing one more or maybe two at least. It kind of depends on the cycle, because we haven’t done a record in five years. I don’t want to do that again. I’d like to have another in three, if we can pull it off. But if we keep getting offered tours, it might take that long.

For us, when we go on tour, we drop any new stuff we’re doing to concentrate on the live show. And the types of tours we’ve been doing have been frequent enough, but sporadic enough that is becomes difficult to get much done on new material. We’re always coming up with ideas, I have a lot of ideas that are left over from this record, but we really need to stop completely from touring to be able to work them into songs.

KNAC.COM: Do you have anything special planned for your Unholy Alliance tour? Is it going to be a big production because it’s playing bigger places?

KING: We’re trying to figure all that out now. We’ve been so focused on the record that we haven’t talked that much about the tour. So I don’t know what we’re going to do, but it starts in two months, so we’re gonna have to throw something together pretty quick (laughs).

KNAC.COM: You could always do a Gwar take on your Reign In Blood shows and spray the audience with blood instead of you, or something.

KING: You know, someone already brought that up (laughs). But the problem with anything like that is you always get some clown who’ll complain about his faggoty T-shirt getting messed up, and the less we have to deal with lawyers the better. We get in enough trouble as it is.

In Part 2, frontman Tom Araya offers his take on Slayer’s latest chapter, how many chapters he thinks Slayer has left to write and how sometimes the band really does do it for the money.



“You don’t burn out from going too fast. You burn out from going too slow and getting bored.” - Cliff Burton

Kirk Hamster Offline

The Prince/Princess


Beiträge: 779

27.04.2006 18:04
#425 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

27.04.2006: Nationaler SLAYER-Tag
Auch die US-Thrash-Könige SLAYER machen sich die Tatsache zunutze, dass es in diesem Jahr das Datum 06.06.06 gibt. Am 6. Juni nämlich lassen sie ihre neue Single von der Kette. Um den Konservativen ihres Heimatlandes ans Bein zu pinkeln, hat man diesen Tag kurzerhand als ´National Day of SLAYER´ ausgerufen. (In den USA gab es bislang nur den ´National Day of Prayer´.) Was es an diesem schönen Tag zu tun gilt, könnt ihr hier nachlesen. Die offizielle Seite zum SLAYER-Tag gibt genaue Anweisungen, wie und wo man der Band huldigen soll.

http://www.nationaldayofslayer.org/

quelle: rockhard.de

also wer macht mit ?
Ich würde ja gerne, bin aber verhindert, gehe auf irgendsoein metalkonzert in Berlin...




“You don’t burn out from going too fast. You burn out from going too slow and getting bored.” - Cliff Burton

Kirk Hamster Offline

The Prince/Princess


Beiträge: 779

04.05.2006 10:31
#426 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Neues Interview mit Tom Araya:
KNAC.COM: You guys must feel pretty confident in the material if you went into the studio the only 11 songs you had?

ARAYA: Definitely. I guess our thought process about that, for some reason it seems to be pretty unanimous among the three of us, is that it’s best to work on the songs you feel really good about. If you do 30 songs you have to wade through which ones are best — and, of course, not everyone’s gonna agree. And you’ve spent all this time with 30 songs, when you might only end up using 12. To me it’s like we’ve got these 11 that sound great, we’re just gonna work on these 11 and make them the best we can.

On God Hates there was a shitload of songs, by a shitload I mean like 16, which is a lot for us. And we had a bunch of songs that to me, the last few that we worked on anyway, didn’t come out as great as they could of been and to me that was a waste of time and a waste of some really good material that could have been better.

The record company’s always gonna be like, “Can you do two more?” And that’s primarily for the foreign market. And this time we’re like, “You know, fuck that. We’re gonna give you this many songs, how you want to divvy them out is up to you. And you know why? These are the ones we think are great. The other ones that we had sucked, so we dumped them.” (laughs) To me, it’s work with what you like, otherwise forget it.

KNAC.COM: It’s been five years since the last album, so you obviously were pretty well prepared for this one?

ARAYA: We usually rehearse our songs a lot, that’s how we know whether we like them or not. There’s a lot of time when someone will come in with a song that all of a sudden just disappears.

Sometimes I’ll ask, “I wonder what happened to this one?”

And they [Kerry and Jeff] will be like, “Oh, we didn’t like it.”

“Ah, OK, I thought there were some good parts in it.”

“Yeah, there were, but overall the song was terrible.”

Sometimes they take the good parts and mutate them into another song, so by the time we get in the studio it’s all pretty well rehearsed. On this one, we’ve been working with the material for a few years now. I think we’ve had it for about three years. But we’ve done a lot of touring, we’ve had a lot of opportunities come up.

And, I’m not going to lie to you, it was all about money. Money and opportunities, and not only that, they were high-profile opportunities so we figured, “Fuck it, we’ll do this since no one was in any real hurry.” And then Rubin got into this distribution thing that was going on, so that allotted us even more time to take advantage of the opportunities that came along.

And when it came time to record, I came out and we started demoing stuff and they started fine tuning it and to me everything was sounding really good. We were ready in December, that’s when I started coming in so we could demo everything. I thought everything sounded great, it was tight. But then there were the usual delays. And we were trying for a June release date to have it out on the “magic number” this year.

KNAC.COM: That would be June 6 [6/6/06]?

ARAYA: Of course (laughs). But we lost that. I think the tour starts on that date, so at least that’s something.

KNAC.COM: Speaking of release dates, I asked Kerry about this, but are your thoughts on God Hates coming out the day of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks?

ARAYA: I couldn’t help but put those two together. It wasn’t irony, it was more like, “Fuck! Somebody’s god really hates us.” Their belief system, their god is why they do the things that they do, and he obviously hates us. I think that was a pretty fucking strong coincidence. Definitely does make you stop and think.

KNAC.COM: Kerry spoke of “Jihad” as a song that touches upon that belief system, but he also mentioned a song you wrote the lyrics for, “Eyes of the Insane,” that dealt with the after-effects of the war.

ARAYA: Yeah, it was based on an article I read in Texas Monthly about the casualties of war, the soldiers. The article was about how a lot of soldiers are really having a tough time coping with the trauma and all of the shit that they witnessed, basically they get really mental.

That song is about that part of the war, and it is a great tragedy and it seems to be neglected. At points in their tour of Iraq, they need help and the military tends to ignore that, they kind of brush it under the mat and hopes it goes away. They try to make everything seem hunky dory and fine and dandy, when in actuality there is a lot of shit going on that people can’t handle. There’s a lot of soldiers coming home with mental anguish. And the sad part is, we heard about post-traumatic stress after Vietnam and the first Gulf War and the military seems to want to wipe the slate clean with every new war. It’s fucked up.

This whole issue of Texas Monthly was about the war and the Texas military’s involvement with it. It looked at all the services and talked about the good and the bad, it was very “fair and balanced,” (laughs). But it had an article about all of the Texas who had died, and that one article I mentioned about those who have returned from the war really blew my mind. They go and come home missing a few pieces.

KNAC.COM: Kerry mentioned a few other songs, but I’d like to get your take on the rest of the material?

ARAYA: The two songs we were just talking about are the only ones that touch on the subject of current events, the recent war. There are some other songs that are loosely based on war, but it could be anywhere at any time. He must have mentioned the song he wrote called “Flesh Storm.” The title alone says it all with that one.

There’s a song that we’re still feeling that is almost done that Jeff and I have been working with called “Black Serenade.” And right now there’s one other song that needs to be written to that lately I’ve been trying to come up with some ideas for. But I want to write it first before I start talking about it (laughs).

What else did Kerry tell you?

KNAC.COM: Pretty much what he always seems to say, that they “sound like Slayer songs.”

ARAYA: (Laughs) Well that’s about all I can tell you, too. It’s a Slayer record. People won’t be disappointed. We’re not going to come out with something completely different. And I don’t want that to mean that this one sounds just like this, that or the other, but the minute you hear it, you’ll recognize it as Slayer. It encompasses everything we’ve done. And usually ever record encompasses everything we’ve done, with something new added to it. And this one isn’t any different.

There’s one song that has a new element for a Slayer record and somebody yesterday was asking, “Well, what is it?” And I’m not gonna tell you, when you hear it it’ll be like, “Ah, that’s what he was talking about.” It’s pretty obvious. It’s Slayer, but you’ll realize that it’s something new for us.

KNAC.COM: How do you feel about having Dave back?

ARAYA: It’s cool. The one and only thing that he brings to what we were and what we are is his style, he helped create the foundation of what Slayer is and there’s nobody like him. He’s a very freestyle drummer, not a very disciplined drummer. Paul was a very technical drummer.

Paul had a lot to do with the albums that he was on, he didn’t get much credit for anything and he really had a lot to do with everything. When Divine [his first album] was being put together, he helped a lot and didn’t get any real credit for any of that.

KNAC.COM: He did get the opening salvo on the opening song.

ARAYA: Yeah, but on Divine a lot of the stuff on there was from Kerry. Paul helped arrange a lot of stuff on the album, and the same thing with God Hates, which was a lot of songs that were Kerry’s. So Paul had a lot to do with those albums arrangement-wise and structure-wise. When Jeff writes, he usually everything thought out and he hands everyone a demo and we learn it. With Kerry, once he has the riffs, he’ll sit down with the drummer and work out the arrangements.

Dave has a style of his own and he comes up with some real crazy shit, he’s really into just playing. He’ll come in, you’ll show him a riff and he just starts playing. And it’s never the same, he always changes as it goes along. When we hear something that we think is cool, the trick is trying to get him to play it twice. He does really good stuff just off the cuff.

KNAC.COM: Now that he’s toured and recorded with you again, how is the band as a unit?

ARAYA: Dave’s acclimated back in the band, but that’s not going to ever change how we are. We’re dysfunctional, and that’s never going to change.

KNAC.COM: Still, I guess it says something that this is his third stint with the band Paul had two turns. You can take the boy out of Slayer, but you can’t take Slayer out of the boy.

ARAYA: (laughs) Yeah, that’s about it. It comes down to one rule, the one rule of law that we all know and understand, that without the other, this wouldn’t exist. So we’ve lived the past 25 years knowing that, so you either co-exist or you cease to exist. We understood that a long time ago.

KNAC.COM: So when Slayer season’s over, so to speak, you all go your separate ways and keep your distance from one another? That’s your idea of peaceful co-existence?

ARAYA: Pretty much. I don’t live in California anymore, like everyone else, so it’s easy for me to have my own space, but that’s basically how it is. But when we see each other, it’s kind of how we were when we left off, so it’s kind of like putting a book down, and when you show up, you pick it back up and continue reading where you left off.

It’s like the tours are over, the record cycle is over, all the stuff is over, you put the book down and when you come back together to start working on ideas or start doing stuff, it’s time to pick the book back up and start reading again. And once you’ve read your fair share of chapters, you put the book down and you’re gone, then you come back and start reading again.

KNAC.COM: Since you’re making analogies to books, how many chapters do you see left in the Slayer story?

ARAYA: I don’t know. I do know that after this record there is one more record that Rubin has an option of either doing it or not. But I do know that after this record cycle is over, there is one more record to be done. And it’s up to Rubin whether he wants to pick up the option, and I guess everyone is hoping that he will. And if he does, it means we have at least one more chapter (laughs).

KNAC.COM: Earlier you mentioned something about tours that you did “for the money.” Slayer’s been a relatively successful band, comparatively, but are you happy with the career path the band has had? Would you have liked to have had more commercial success?

ARAYA: Everyone’s gonna feel like they should have sold a few more records, and that would have been nice. But I’m not complaining. I think we’ve had a very good, long, slow-growth career, which means that we’ll definitely be around a long time. Being rich doesn’t make you popular, and I think the slow growth that we’ve had, it’s taken us this long to reach the level that we’re at, it’s gonna take twice as long for people to forget about us. That’s the way I look at it.

This is going to be around way after we’re gone, by the time this physically ends for the band itself. Kind of like the Sabbath thing. Sabbath didn’t get the recognition they deserved to begin with, but shit, 30 years later they’re like fucking gods. They’re getting so much recognition now and it’s finally paying off. That’s the way I look at it for us.

After 20-25 years of doing what we do, we’re just starting to reap the rewards of what we initially started. We’ve been given opportunities, offers, that we just couldn’t turn down. So you do them. And after 25 years we’re getting top dollar (laughs). In my opinion we’re being paid what we’re actually worth now. For all those years we weren’t getting what we were worth, now we are. But I’m really happy with the success Slayer has had.

KNAC.COM: Up-and-coming bands still look at Slayer as the benchmark, I guess they figure if they can reach your league, they’ve made it.

ARAYA: Well we’ve actually given the heads up to a lot of bands that have gone beyond us (laughs). But somehow they tend to fizzle out, they don’t have the staying power or the will, I guess, to keep it together and try to make it a long career. But that was never our intention, we never meant to make it a long career, you just never know what happens in this industry. So we happen to be very lucky to have stayed around as long as we have.

And with every new cycle we have a new audience. There’s always that kid out there who’s into metal and then there’s his one friend that goes, “Well, do you want to hear something really heavy?” (laughs) And they flip on a Slayer record and that kid listens to it and goes, “Fuck!” And his friend tells him, “Well, look at all these other ones they’ve got.” And right there we’ve got a new fan and a new kid who wants to see the band or get the new record or whatever. But it’s been a cycle of that, and every 10 years it’s repeated.

KNAC.COM: In some weird way, it’s probably a good thing you didn’t have a 5 million selling record?

ARAYA: (laughs) Hey, you know what, it’s still possible. My glass is half full, I don’t know about yours. We’re still waiting for that one record to do it, so I’m not discounting anything, there’s always that possibility. But until then, or if then, we’re very content with the way things have gone. Yeah, it would have been great, but I don’t think I would have appreciated things as much as I do now if we had.

KNAC.COM: Your brother John’s band, Thine Eyes Bleed, will be on the Unholy Alliance Tour, have your bands ever played together before?

ARAYA: Never, this will be the first time ever. I’m excited and I think it’s going to be pretty exciting for them because for one, they actually have a really good record. He joined after the album was recorded, but John has been through this process for as long as we have. He was a part of us and worked with us for 15-20 years. And during that time he worked with other musicians as a guitar tech. He was Lou Reed’s guitar tech for a while, he’s worked with really good bands and everyone’s come to know him, so he’s had a life on the road for some time.

KNAC.COM: Is his first band?

ARAYA: At this level, yes. His dream has always to be a part of a band or do his own thing, and they offered him this opportunity to join the band and the band is doing really well. Just like any other band, you get on tours that just kind of fizzle. So they’ve had their lumps, they’ve had their school of hard knocks trying to get on something stable, so when this came up I told our manager, “I want my brother to open up the tour. They’re a really good band and I’m not going to take no for an answer.”

And I talked to Dave and Jeff and Kerry and said, “Hey, I want them on the bill, I don’t want to hear no’s, I just want to hear no problem. They’ll open the show and there’s no problem there.”

Nepotism really can pay off.

They’re a good band and I want them to at least have a full-blown tour where they can say, “hey we did an entire tour.” We’ve given everybody else opportunities.

KNAC.COM: And they’ll get to play for big crowds, not in some hole in the wall.

ARAYA: He’s had his fair share of those, which is no different than the first time we toured (laughs). We played to a packed house of 20. But he’s been unfortunate enough to play before a crowd of like the three or four other bands on the bill, and no one else, so they’ve had their fair share of disappointments.

KNAC.COM: Whose idea was this tour?

ARAYA: It’s something our manager [Rick Sales] has been conjuring for a while now. They set it up to do a European tour, which we did with Slipknot like a year, year and a half ago. And that’s where it started and he wanted to market the title and he hopes it will be a recurring tour that comes through the states, kind of like Ozzfest. He wants to brand the name. He actually wants to take it worldwide. And this time around he said he wanted to put together a package that could rival Ozzfest so he came up with these bands, and it’s a cool line up.

Mastadon is a “different” type of metal altogether, and I mean that in a good way. They toured with us before and they’re actually really good. And Lamb of God is a different style of metal than what we do, as is my brother’s band. Children of Bodom is European metal and I’m not really that familiar with them, but I listened to the disc and if they sound anything like the disc live, they should be pretty good. It all should be pretty good.



“You don’t burn out from going too fast. You burn out from going too slow and getting bored.” - Cliff Burton

Kirk Hamster Offline

The Prince/Princess


Beiträge: 779

11.05.2006 13:35
#427 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

The SLAYER-headlined "Unholy Alliance Tour: Preaching to the Perverted", featuring LAMB OF GOD, CHILDREN OF BODOM, MASTODON, and THINE EYES BLEED, and originally slated to launch on June 6 (06/06/06) in San Diego, CA will now kick off on June 10 at the East Peoria Convention Center in Peoria, IL.

The postponement of the tour's start date is due to SLAYER bassist/vocalist Tom Araya's minor gallbladder surgery which successfully took place late last week. Araya is doing fine, recuperating at home.

With the tour's kick off now June 10, Six-Six-O-Six will still be a special day for SLAYER fans. On that day, SLAYER will release "Eternal Pyre", a limited-edition EP that will preview "Cult", a brand-new song from the band's as-yet-untitled new album (due out July 25), a live version of "Dead Skin Mask", recorded at last year's With Full Force Festival, exclusive behind-the-scenes footage of the making of the new album, and, originally available only on 1995's now out-of-print "Live Intrusion" video, a five-minute clip of the SLAYER fan who carved the band's name into his forearm.

"Eternal Pyre" will be available exclusively at all Hot Topic stores.

The members of SLAYER — Araya, Kerry King/guitars, Jeff Hanneman/guitars, and drummer Dave Lombardo — are in the final stages of completing their new album, SLAYER's first new studio album since Lombardo rejoined the band in 2001. The new album is being produced by Josh Abraham and executive produced by Rick Rubin and will be released on SLAYER's longtime label, Rubin's American Recordings. Titles for some of the album's new songs include "Cult", "Consfearcy", "Eyes of the Insane", and "Jihad". In a recent interview with MTV, Araya said about the new album, "It's fast — maybe faster than anything we've done before. No one's going to be disappointed. It's going to be brutal."



“You don’t burn out from going too fast. You burn out from going too slow and getting bored.” - Cliff Burton

Burden_of_Grief Offline

Comfortably Numb


Beiträge: 7.272

12.05.2006 14:28
#428 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Stimmt das eigentlich das die Divine Intervation verboten ist, wegen dem Sex, Murder Art ? Habe ich gestern nur so gehört, weil wir von der CD gar keine Lieder im Club spielen dürften.



http://www.totalravage.de

GRIND your MIND


They think they know who I am
All they know is I love to kill
Face down, dead on the ground
Find me before another is found

I come alive in the darkness
Left murdered and nameless
Dead unburied and rotten
Half eaten by insects

She was so beautyful
I had to kill her


Saber Rider Offline

Godfather of Metal


Beiträge: 6.461

12.05.2006 14:37
#429 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

In Antwort auf:
" No one's going to be disappointed."

Na wenn sie sich da mal nicht gehörig selbst überschätzen und den Hype unnötig selbst in den Himmel treiben...

Who are you to wave your finger? So full of it. Eyeballs deep in muddy waters, Fucking hypocrite.
Liar, lawyer, mirror show me, what's the difference? Kangaroo done, hung the guilty with the innocent.

When you pissed all over my black kettle, you must have been high, high.
You must have been high, high.

So who are you to wave your finger? Who are you to wave your fatty fingers at me?
You must have been out your mind.

girlsetsfire Offline

Scary Guy/Gal


Beiträge: 1.842

12.05.2006 17:35
#430 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

In Antwort auf:
27.04.2006: Nationaler SLAYER-Tag
Auch die US-Thrash-Könige SLAYER machen sich die Tatsache zunutze, dass es in diesem Jahr das Datum 06.06.06 gibt. Am 6. Juni nämlich lassen sie ihre neue Single von der Kette. Um den Konservativen ihres Heimatlandes ans Bein zu pinkeln, hat man diesen Tag kurzerhand als ´National Day of SLAYER´ ausgerufen. (In den USA gab es bislang nur den ´National Day of Prayer´.) Was es an diesem schönen Tag zu tun gilt, könnt ihr hier nachlesen. Die offizielle Seite zum SLAYER-Tag gibt genaue Anweisungen, wie und wo man der Band huldigen soll.

http://www.nationaldayofslayer.org/

quelle: rockhard.de

also wer macht mit ?
Ich würde ja gerne, bin aber verhindert, gehe auf irgendsoein metalkonzert in Berlin...


Orr, wie klasse is das denn? Gottseidank haben meine Nachbarn n Hund! Also ich mach das...hab eh Ferien...ein Grund für eine weitere Fete!



Witzig - Intelligent - Verrückt - Originell - Schlagfertig - Trüe (Userwahl 2006)
... und absolut nicht nett.
Dafür sind meine Beiträge suuuuper informativ und mein halbleeres Profil ist ein Traum.

Mein Hut der hat 3 Ecken, 3 Ecken hat mein Hut und hätt er nicht 3 Ecken so wäre er nicht mein Hut.

Burden_of_Grief Offline

Comfortably Numb


Beiträge: 7.272

12.05.2006 17:39
#431 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Ich hab da was, ich bin mir schon am überlegen ob ichs mir in die Signatur packe.




http://www.totalravage.de

GRIND your MIND


They think they know who I am
All they know is I love to kill
Face down, dead on the ground
Find me before another is found

I come alive in the darkness
Left murdered and nameless
Dead unburied and rotten
Half eaten by insects

She was so beautyful
I had to kill her


Saber Rider Offline

Godfather of Metal


Beiträge: 6.461

12.05.2006 18:00
#432 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

*lol*

"Official Statement on Participation

Listen to Slayer at full blast in your car.
Listen to Slayer at full blast in your home.
Listen to Slayer at full blast at your place of employment.
Listen to Slayer at full blast in any public place you prefer.

DO NOT use headphones! The objective of this day is for everyone within earshot to understand that it is the National Day of Slayer. National holidays in America aren't just about celebrating; they're about forcing it upon non-participants."

Kindisch hoch drei.


Who are you to wave your finger? So full of it. Eyeballs deep in muddy waters, Fucking hypocrite.
Liar, lawyer, mirror show me, what's the difference? Kangaroo done, hung the guilty with the innocent.

When you pissed all over my black kettle, you must have been high, high.
You must have been high, high.

So who are you to wave your finger? Who are you to wave your fatty fingers at me?
You must have been out your mind.

Burden_of_Grief Offline

Comfortably Numb


Beiträge: 7.272

12.05.2006 18:03
#433 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Man sehs mit Humor. Naja wenn man Emo ist muss man alles ernst nehmen, stimmt.



http://www.totalravage.de

GRIND your MIND


They think they know who I am
All they know is I love to kill
Face down, dead on the ground
Find me before another is found

I come alive in the darkness
Left murdered and nameless
Dead unburied and rotten
Half eaten by insects

She was so beautyful
I had to kill her


Saber Rider Offline

Godfather of Metal


Beiträge: 6.461

12.05.2006 18:13
#434 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Nenn mich ja nie wieder Emo, sonst schlitz ich mir wegen dir meine Arme auf. *schnüff*


Who are you to wave your finger? So full of it. Eyeballs deep in muddy waters, Fucking hypocrite.
Liar, lawyer, mirror show me, what's the difference? Kangaroo done, hung the guilty with the innocent.

When you pissed all over my black kettle, you must have been high, high.
You must have been high, high.

So who are you to wave your finger? Who are you to wave your fatty fingers at me?
You must have been out your mind.

Child of the Wicked Offline

Resident Mädchenschwarm of Death


Beiträge: 7.382

12.05.2006 18:28
#435 RE: RE:Slayer antworten

Du EMO! Du bist ein EMO!!! Du bist ein EMO!!!Du bist ein EMO!!!Du bist ein EMO!!! Sabbel Ritter isn EMO!!! *mitfingerzeigundauslach*



Gehts hier auch mal um METAL???


Resident Mädchenschwarm of Death - Userwahl 2005

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